The Sound of Privacy

Posted by: on Nov 12, 2013 | No Comments

album cover for "Private" by Speedometer For a little bit there, in the late 90s and early 00s, I really thought dance music was going to take off, going to transcend its XTC-popping, glowstick-swinging roots. And of course that happened, but in (for me, anyway) the worst way possible. Now *everyone* listens to dance music – and that’s great! But I feel like most of what comes out today is just screechy, slurry noise that passes off as “hip”, or else it’s Top 40 high fructose corn syrup.

Of course, a few brave souls are still making great electronic music in the right-now (Boards of Canada!), but it’s hard not to get cynical. It seems like the loud and vulgar always crowds out the understated and beautiful. But nothing, nothing can detract from the joy and wonder of the late 90s and early 00s.

Take Private (2002), one of my all-time favorite albums, by speedometer., the stage name of Jun Takayama. Private is, as far as Yours Truly is concerned, a masterpiece of dance/electronica. Therefore it’s all the more heartbreaking that it’s so utterly obscure. I can’t even recall how I came across Private; I think I heard one of the tracks on soma.fm while lettering Rex Mundi at 3 in the morning, and I took a chance on the full album. The chance paid off, in droves.

What can I say about speedometer.’s sound? Sure, it’s downtempo, chill out, space jazz, whatever – but none of those descriptors even come close to capturing the beauty of the music. So here’s Nightboat from Alaska, the first track from the album. I love the mysterious, shimmering timbre of the melody, the skittery jazz percussion, the rubbery Angelo Badalamenti bass, and the saxophone.

The saxophone.

Private Roots, the second track, is my favorite, and the fact that it only has 15 views on YouTube is a sickening crime. Yoshie Nakano, the vocalist on this piece, deserves like ten Grammys. Downtempo dance tends to feature a lot of soulful, jazzy female vocals, but the vocalists don’t always have the chops. Well, Nakano has chops. You can’t fake passion and intensity like hers.

The entire album is perfect, one of the rare cases where you can listen from beginning to end without skipping a track. It’s available on iTunes, wedged in somewhere between the Justin Bieber remixes feat. Nelly and singles from The Voice™. If you happen to be lucky enough to live near a small record store that specializes in electronica/dance, they might have it, too, but I dunno. Like I said, this album never got the attention it deserved.

I somehow hunted down speedometer.’s earlier album, …Or Not, and there are a few fleeting moments of brilliance in it that are fully realized in Private. Checking speedometer’s Web site, I can see he released a bunch of albums after Private, but I have no way of knowing how to get them in a way that financially compensates Jun Takayama. Which is sad, but at least he’s still making music. That, by itself, makes me happy.

Okay. I’m going to go listen to Slayer now.

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